Joints

Neck

Neck pain may result from abnormalities in the soft tissues - the muscles, ligaments, and nerves - as well as in bones and joints of the spine. The most common causes of neck pain are soft tissue abnormalities due to injury or prolonged wear and tear. In rare cases, infection or tumors may cause neck pain. In some people, neck problems may be the source of pain in the upper back, shoulders or arms.

Degenerative and inflammatory diseases - Degenerative diseases that cause neck pain include osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis usually occurs in older people as a result of wear of the joints between the bones in the neck. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause destruction of the joints of the neck. Both of these major types of arthritis can cause stiffness and pain.

Cervical disk degeneration also can cause neck pain. The disk acts as a shock absorber between the bones in the neck. In cervical disk degeneration (typically age 40 onwards), the normal gelatin-like center of the disk degenerates and the space between the vertebrae narrows. As the disk space narrows, added stress is applied to the joints of the spine causing further wear and degenerative disease. The cervical disk may also protrude and cause pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots when the rim of the disk weakens. This is known as a herniated cervical disk.

Injury - Because the neck is so flexible and because it supports the head, it is extremely vulnerable to injury. Motor vehicle or diving accidents, contact sports, and falls may result in neck injury. The regular use of safety belts in motor vehicles can help to prevent or minimize injury. A "rear end" automobile collision may result in hyperextension, a backward motion of the neck beyond normal limits, or hyperflexion, a forward motion of the neck beyond normal limits. Most common injuries are to the soft tissues, i.e., muscles and ligaments. Severe injury with fracture or dislocation of the neck may damage the spinal cord and cause paralysis (quadriplegia).

Much less common causes of neck pain include tumors, infections, or congenital abnormalities of the vertebrae.

Evaluation according to SEA - Acupuncture

Radiological examination is fundamental to assess cervical lesion, arhtrosis, pinching, deformation, curve, status of foramina, and so forth. The energetic evaluation will include evaluation of the sensitive points, the associate meridian involvement, the state in excess or deficiency and the response to treatment in terms of emergences.

Conditions

  1. Functional pain
  2. Moderate arthrosis
  3. Traumatic neck pain (i.e. whiplash)
  4. Arnold neuralgia
  5. Cervical arthrosis
  6. Pain associated with anxiety/stress
  7. Inflammation

 

Knee

Some knee pain can respond to acupuncture. Thorough evaluation of the knee is necessary and infection is a formal contra-indication to acupuncture.

Evaluation according to SE - Acupuncture

Evaluation includes support from the Western medical investigations (preferably radiography of both knees) as well as complete energetic acupuncture approach:

(1) evaluation of the knee area through palpation of the meridian networks

(2) evaluation of systems corresponding to the meridian networks.

Conditions

  1. Tendinitis
  2. Common arthritis
  3. Mild arthrosis
  4. Meniscus: non-traumatic
  5. Post-traumatic pain (fracture and post-operation)

 

Shoulder

Shoulder pain, and pain associated to the shoulder (i.e. neck and arm) are clinical cases full of ambush and traps.

Some cases look difficult and react extremely well. Others, simple, do not react.

Evaluation according to SE - Acupuncture

Evaluation includes support from the Western medical investigations (preferably radiography of the neck and of both shoulders) as well as complete energetic acupuncture approach:

(1) evaluation of the shoulder area through palpation of the meridian networks

(2) evaluation of systems corresponding to the meridian networks.

Conditions

  1. Clinic involving muscles and tendons
  2. Clinic involving bone and joint
  3. Neurological clinic
  4. Calcifications
  5. Cervical arthrosis
  6. Psychogenic pain
  7. Frozen shoulder

 

Hip

Hip pains are clinical cases full of ambush and traps.

Some cases look difficult and react extremely well. Others, simple, do not react.

Evaluation according to SE - Acupuncture

Evaluation includes support from the Western medical investigations (preferably radiography of the pelvis in order to compare the two coxofemoral joints) as well as complete energetic acupuncture approach.

Conditions

  1. Tendinitis
  2. Trochanter pain
  3. Functional hip pain, negative radiology
  4. Periarthritis
  5. Retractile capsulitis
  6. Moderate arthrosis